310-961-4877 (Skype) gb@garybartanus.com

Educational Technology Mentorship

When well used and shared, the value of edtech is priceless.

Project: Educational Technology Mentorship

The following summaries, artifacts, and reflections document some mentorship roles.

The blue toggles contains summaries that trace several of the roles and projects I have undertaken while serving the education community and doing all that I can to help both students and colleagues to benefit from the use of technology. Above all other professional goals, using emerging technologies to continually advance the cause of providing the best possible positive differences for others has been my guiding principle for several years.

SUMMARY OF PROJECTS, WORKSHOPS, PRESENTATIONS, AND SERVICES UNDERTAKEN WHILE IN KOREA (tap/click to open)

May 2015 to present

Chair, Hanyang English Film Festival organizing committee – engage both faculty and students in the advancement of 21st century literacies; responsible for delegating and coordinating responsibilities in a group of 20 volunteers on behalf of our department (of approximately 30 teachers and staff members) and the undergraduates of Hanyang University (approximately 24,500 students).

A detailed description of the most significant accomplishments for this project is posted on the Film Festival Project page on this website.

March 2015 to present

Co-chair of BAE Blended Course Committee – to improve the learning experiences and outcomes of students who enroll in our department’s first officially sanctioned hybrid English class, the committee regularly consults and collaborates with administration, staff, and faculty to design and conduct surveys, collect and analyze data, and implement the recommended revisions and best practices that emerge from the committee’s ongoing reassessment/revision process.

May  2014 to March 2015

Co-leader of Basic Academic English Online Course Design Team – founded a course redesign team that embraced diverging educational backgrounds, philosophies, and pedagogies. This resulted in the redesign of an established EFL course that affords the broadest possible appeal for a very diverse faculty of instructors and body of learners.

Aside from forming a great partnership between two very different educators, one significant achievement in this project was our successful negotiation for the inclusion of more interactivity in the online component of the course. The university’s E-learning department had originally stipulated that there should be only one solitary professor appearing on camera and that he/she should deliver all the course content in the form of lectures and presentations. Bolstered by the research-based knowledge that came from the UBC MET Program, I objected to this and was able to persuade our team to use our pilot lesson to demonstrate a more interactive approach to the E-learning team. Fortunately, the E-learning department saw merit in this approach and my objection ultimately resulted in them withdrawing their original stipulation and requesting that we provide our more interactive approach in the entire course.

January 2013 to August 2015

Graduate Student at the University of British Columbia – the Master of Educational Technology Program was 100% online and I completed it while working in Korea. I participated in numerous group projects for various major assignments. The numerous synchronous and asynchronous collaborations with colleagues from all over the world were excellent opportunities to learn about different world views and intercultural perspectives.

In addition to using Skype or Google+ Hangouts for synchronous collaboration, I also made frequent use of video for many of our group discussion forums. This approach was considered by colleagues and professors to be innovative and, if videos were kept short, very effective. With Camtasia and creativity, I was often able to most efficiently make my points by “showing” rather than “telling.”

February 2012 to present

Workshop Facilitator and Technology Mentor at Hanyang University – gave presentations, talks, and facilitated several workshops for technology related PD activities

Year by Year Details:

2016

Bartanus, G. (2016). Report on the 2016 Hanyang English Film Festival. Departmental Talk to the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, June 17, 2016.

Bartanus, G., Choi, S. (2016). Informational Presentation and Workshop for Students Participating in the 2016 Hanyang University English Film Festival. Departmental Talk/Workshop to undergraduate students of Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, April 5, 2016.

Bartanus, G., (2016). Presentation and Workshop on Plans for a Focus on Digital Literacy in the 2016 Hanyang English Film Festival. Departmental Talk/Workshop to the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, February 25, 2016.

2015

Bartanus, G., Warren, J., (2015). Co-host (emcee) of 2015 Hanyang English Film Festival. Departmental Service for the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, May 19, 2015.

Bartanus, G., Newton, M. (2015). Blended Basic Academic English (BAE) Course Workshop. Departmental Talk for instructors of the newly redesigned blended BAE course, College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, February 25, 2015.

Bartanus, G. (2015). Moderator for Live Broadcast of a Google Hangout on Mobile Collaboration. Professional Service to Open Educational Resource (OER), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, February 7, 2015.

2014

Bartanus, G., Newton, M. (2014). Blended Basic Academic English (BAE) Course Video Presentation and Workshop. Departmental Talk/Workshop for the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, August 28, 2014.

Bartanus, G., Newton, M. (2014). Report on the Results of an Online Faculty Survey Regarding Expectations for the Blended Basic Academic English (BAE) Course Redesign Project. Departmental Talk for the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, June 20, 2014.

2013

Bartanus, G. (2013). Professional Academic English (PAE) Presentation Contest Web Pages. Continuing Professional (web design) Service in Hanyang CEEC Professors website, October 11, 2013, to present.

Bartanus, G. (2013). Hanyang English Film Festival Web Pages. Continuing Professional (web design) Service in Hanyang CEEC Professors website, October 2, 2013, to present.

Bartanus, G. (2013). Report on English Writing with Multimedia, a blended course using constructivist principles. Departmental Talk for the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, August 29, 2013.

2012

Bartanus, G. (2012). Workshop and Resource Website for Enhancing Students’ Learning Experiences with Free (or nearly free) Software. Departmental Talk/Service for the College English Education Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, April 14, 2012.

Bartanus, G. (2012). Using Google Drive with the Canvas Learning Management System to Support Colleagues and Students with Minimal Effort. Departmental Service for the Teaching with Technology Committee, Centre for Integrated General Education, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, February 5 to February 22, 2012.

 

Mentoring in Korea

Below are live examples of some of the most recent projects that demonstrate my role is an “EdTech Mentor” at Hanyang University: 

SOFTWARE WORKSHOP & RESOURCE SITE
April 14, 2012

  • facilitated a software workshop for my department
  • demonstrated 3 free or nearly free applications
  • provided hands-on practice for all
  • developed a resource site for post-workshop follow up

Note: as of 2016, all 3 applications are still currently available, very affordable, and extremely useful. 

PRESENTATION CONTEST SITE AND VIDEOS
(created in October, 2013)

  • supports our department’s annual presentation contest
  • hosts videos of student presentations
  • provides registration information, deadlines, and rules
  • inspires aspiring presenters to consider future competitions
  • gives excellent teaching tools to interested teachers

FILM FESTIVAL SITE
(created in October, 2013)

  • supports our department’s annual English film festival
  • hosts videos of student films
  • provides registration information, deadlines, and rules
  • inspires students to develop 21st century literacies
  • provides film submission upload space
  • allows judges to watch the films in private, with little chance of being swayed by other judges

Teacher Orientation Video for the New Online BAE Course

As a follow-up to the workshops that the online course design team had conducted with our department, I produced this orientation video:

Example of Great Teamwork

The following video was made for a committee Chair who requested that I try to design an online rubric for our department’s annual English presentation contest.  The idea was to make it available for judges to use via their smartphones, tablets, or notebooks during the live contest.

The video demonstrates the rubric that I designed and it leaves it up to the committee members to decide whether or not to use it. It points out that, with the rubric built in a Google Sheet spreadsheet, it would significantly enhance the speed, simplicity, and reliability of calculating the scores (which is a tedious task when done manually). But the video also acknowledges that inputting the data without being able to make notes (except on paper) may be considered inaccurate and cumbersome – especially for judges who are not technologically inclined.

In the end, the committee decided against using the online rubric, thanked me for my efforts, and proceeded to produce the best presentation contest ever!  This is indeed very gratifying because, in the final analysis, it’s the students’ experience that matters most – not the technology.

Consulting, Training, and Mentoring in Canada

Interactive Workshops, Presentations, and Displays

Prior to moving into higher education, most of my work involved helping others (teachers, psychologists, speech language pathologists, occupational therapists, etc.) to become more aware of the tools available to them. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework was gaining widespread acceptance and the company I represented was a Canadian distributor of many UDL resources.

After numerous consultations at various conferences and symposiums, I created a website that was designed to provide a centralized resource centre and make it easier for educators and healthcare workers to learn about and assess potential resources that fit or complement the UDL framework. Using video demos & tutorials, plus reviews, and feedback from other knowledgeable users, this site provided practical information that people needed to know when considering these resources. An archived version can be accessed through this link: oldspaces/udlresources.com.

Below are some of the video tutorials that were produced in 2007/8, when the equipment consisted of a Dell home laptop, an aging and oversized Sony DCRTRV27 camcorder, a cheap tripod, unknown external microphone, Pinnacle Studio video editing software, desk lamp, and PowerPoint 2003. Despite those deficiencies, the site and videos were effective and I soon became very busy with presentations and workshops that took me as far east as Sydney, Nova Scotia.

Summary

The following blue toggle contains a sampling of major conferences and conventions where, as a consultant/trainer, I delivered presentations, facilitated workshops, and provided support/training on various UDL technologies before moving overseas and transitioning into higher education.

SUMMARY OF PRESENTATIONS, RESOURCE DEMOS, INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS, AND TRAINING CLINICS IN CANADA

Reflection

It is ironic that in Canada, before coming to Korea (and before earning my Master of Educational Technology degree from UBC), I was able to offer help and support to people on a much larger scale than has been possible here. The reasons for this are more about cultural and philosophical differences than they are about any changes in my professional practice or career goals.

More than any other possible reason, it is because of those cultural and philosophical differences that I have decided to permanently return to Canada. Especially with the new knowledge and competencies afforded by UBC’s excellent MET training, it is vital that I return to a positive environment in which I can get back to fully attaining all of my career goals by once again collaborating on a progressive team of motivated, student-centered, and innovative professionals who enthusiastically share my altruistic approach to using technology for better engaging students and providing them with positively transformative learning experiences.